Friday Five: Rep. Meadows to Speak at NCVC event, DOJ withdraws lawsuit, 2017 legislation and more!

1. Rep. Mark Meadows to speak at NC Values Coalition event. Join us!

Join us May 25th as we host a special event in Charlotte! We will be hosting keynote speaker Congressman Mark Meadows, Chairman of the House Freedom Caucus. Congressman Meadows has been leading the fight in Washington on Healthcare Reform, Tax Reform, Defunding Planned Parenthood and standing for Religious Freedom. To RSVP or learn more, visit: www.ncvalues.org/clt-ticket  

 

2. Pro-Family Legislation in 2017

Every legislative session there are hundreds of bills filed in the State House and Senate. So far this year, there have been 676 bills filed in the Senate and 921 filed in the House. Only about a fourth of the almost 1,600 total bills will actually become law, but in order to be eligible, a bill must be passed in one chamber and cross over to the other chamber by a certain day called “Crossover Deadline”. Yesterday was the Crossover Deadline, and we want to update you as to some bills we hope to help get passed. This list will change as other bills get filed or revised, but it is a partial list for now. (Read more)

 

3. In the Aftermath of the Reset of HB2

Former House Speaker Pro Tempore Paul Stam refutes four claims made by Governor Roy Cooper in the aftermath of HB 2 and its replacement with HB 142:

  1. Governor Cooper claims that HB 142 allows transgendered persons to use the changing room/restrooms of their own choice.
  2. Governor Cooper claims that HB 142 now allows local government (cities and counties) to enact protected classes for their own employees.
  3. Governor Cooper claims that under HB 142 cities and counties can now enact ordinances requiring their bidders to have SOGI ("sexual orientation" and "gender identity") policies.
  4. Governor Cooper indicated he plans to keep pushing for a statewide SOGI law forcing private citizens and business owners to recognize "sexual orientation" and "gender identity" as protected categories. (Read more)

  

4. Republicans in Congress push Trump for religious liberty executive order

"Dozens of Republican lawmakers are asking President Trump to scale back Obama-era protections for gays and lesbians in order to make good on a campaign promise to protect religious liberty.

In early February, Trump was reportedly considering an executive order that would reverse former President Obama’s orders prohibiting discrimination against gays and lesbians in the federal workforce or by federal contractors. But the order was never signed."

Five Congressmen from North Carolina signed the letter—Congressmen Mark Meadows, Ted Budd, David Rouzer, Mark Walker, and Walter Jones. But why did the remainder of our state's 13 Congressmen fail to sign the letter? Also, NC's two U.S. Senators Tom Tillis and Richard Burr failed to sign a similar letter sent a few weeks ago. Read the full letter sent by House members to President Trump here. (Read more)

  

5. DOJ Withdraws Lawsuit Over HB2, ACLU appeal dismissed

"The U.S. Department of Justice will no longer battle with the state of North Carolina over its policies regarding transgender residents.

On Friday morning, the Justice Department and attorneys for North Carolina filed a joint notice of dismissal at the U.S. District Court in North Carolina, stating in the document they were withdrawing both cases "in light of the passage" of House Bill 142, the bill that replaced the controversial House Bill 2 (better known as HB2)." (Read more)

The ACLU's appeal has also been dismissed. 

"All parties to litigation over House Bill 2 have agreed to dismiss an appeal that sought relief for transgender people from bathroom provisions of the law.

The appeal was filed after a court granted a preliminary injunction in Carcaño v. McCrory preventing the North Carolina university system from enforcing HB2 against the three transgender plaintiffs in the lawsuit. The appeal sought to extend that injunction to prevent discrimination against all transgender people in the state.

However, since HB 142 repealed the bathroom language in HB2, parties to the appeal filed a voluntary motion to dismiss it." (Read more)