Ryan T. Anderson of the Heritage Foundation has written an excellent piece on how religious liberty remains under attack. A little over two years ago, the Supreme Court declared gay marriage as the law of the land in all 50 states. Those of us who believe that marriage was created by God to be only the union of one man and one woman were understandably upset by this decision, but it was only the beginning of the assault on religious liberties. 

Two years later, the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear the case of a Denver cake artist, who has been punished by Colorado for declining to bake a cake for a gay wedding because it violates his religious beliefs. Ryan Anderson explains why religious freedom is not "discrimination" and the importance of continuing to protect and foster the freedom of our citizens to adhere to their religious faith.

Read more from the National Review:

Two years to the day after the Supreme Court redefined marriage in Obergefell, the Court announced that it would hear a case about the extent to which private parties may be forced to embrace this new vision of marriage. The case involves Jack Phillips, a Colorado baker who declined to bake a wedding cake for a same-sex-wedding reception.

There was nothing remarkable about Phillips’s decision. With every cake he designs, Jack believes he is serving Christ. He had previously turned down requests to create Halloween-themed cakes, lewd bachelor-party cakes, and a cake celebrating a divorce. Yet Jack was never reprimanded over those decisions. He found himself in hot water only with the same-sex-wedding cake.

The immediate question before the Supreme Court is whether it’s constitutional for Colorado to penalize Jack under its “sexual orientation and gender identity” (SOGI) antidiscrimination statute. But the case has implications for millions of believers from every walk of life and, beyond that, for the health of our culture and our constitutional system of ordered liberty.

Read more here.